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  • jamesiscreativeHi. I'm writing a story about Icelandic Viking Vampires. In this story, the vampires call Halloween the "Darkest Night" because that's when they're stronger. I still don't know enough Icelandic to be able to translate that term, and Internet search gave me "Myrkustu Nótt". Is that right? Or is there some other kind of similar term that makes more sense in Icelandic and is more commonly used? Thanks.
  • fuckyeahislenska

    Because an adjective can be either strong or weak, it’s possible to write it several ways depending on what governs the sentence it appears in. However, because your characters will probably always be calling it “THE darkest night”, an article always governs the weak form. So, the four cases would yield myrkasta nóttin (nom), myrkustu nóttina (acc), myrkustu nóttinni (dat), myrkustu næturinnar (gen).

    As for something more common I’m not too sure. Dimmur is another word for ‘dark’, and there’s a song in the animated movie ‘Anastasia’ called ‘Um niðdimma nótt’… niðdimmur and niðamyrkur both meaning something like ‘pitch dark’.

    You might want to ask íslenskt mál just in case. It’s run by a native speaker with a degree in Icelandic.

  • fuck.yeah.íslenska

    notistic:

    in regards to the use of strong/weak forms of adjectives, the matter is further complicated when discussing superlative adjectives, because the rules of using the weak and strong forms of superlative adjectives are different from using the weak and strong forms of other adjectives. it’s possible to have strong superlative adjectives with both definite and indefinite nouns, for example:

    • hún var kaldasta nóttin sem ég hef þolað á ævinni (it was the coldest night i have ever endured; strong superlative modifying definite noun)
    • hann er sterkasti maður heims (he’s the strongest man in the world; strong superlative modifying indefinite noun)

    generally speaking, the weak forms of superlative adjectives are only used in nominal predicates, e.g. when they stand alone following a copulaic verb such as veraverðalíta (út)virðast, and so on (i am the best, i feel the worst, he looks the cutest, etc.). otherwise, even with indefinite nouns, superlative adjectives generally tend to use their strong forms.

    ^ Or this. This person knows more than me about stuff. So myrkust nóttin(nom), myrkasta nóttina (acc), myrkastri nóttinni (dat), myrkastrar næturinnar(gen)?

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  • jamesiscreativeHi. I'm writing a story about Icelandic Viking Vampires. In this story, the vampires call Halloween the "Darkest Night" because that's when they're stronger. I still don't know enough Icelandic to be able to translate that term, and Internet search gave me "Myrkustu Nótt". Is that right? Or is there some other kind of similar term that makes more sense in Icelandic and is more commonly used? Thanks.
  • Because an adjective can be either strong or weak, it’s possible to write it several ways depending on what governs the sentence it appears in. However, because your characters will probably always be calling it “THE darkest night”, an article always governs the weak form. So, the four cases would yield myrkasta nóttin (nom), myrkustu nóttina (acc), myrkustu nóttinni (dat), myrkustu næturinnar (gen).

    As for something more common I’m not too sure. Dimmur is another word for ‘dark’, and there’s a song in the animated movie ‘Anastasia’ called ‘Um niðdimma nótt’… niðdimmur and niðamyrkur both meaning something like ‘pitch dark’.

    You might want to ask íslenskt mál just in case. It’s run by a native speaker with a degree in Icelandic.

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